Michael Kohler

Mozilla Switzerland Community Meetup 2017

Posted by in Mozilla, MozillaCH, MozillaParticipation, mozillareps

On the 28th of January we, the Mozilla Switzerland, community held another community meetup to organize ourselves for the next few months in 2017.

We did a start/stop/continue analysis of our work in 2016. Here’s the result:

With that in mind, we came up with a few goals for the first half of the year. Since we all agreed on stopping to do unrealistic goals we focused on the most voted ones from above. Of course this doesn’t mean that we will only do those, so everyone is encouraged to also do their own initiatives and we will still have our monthly meetups to bring topics forward.

These are our goals for the first half of 2017. Our motto is: Complete goals and do more instead of running after goal completion and not succeed like we did in the past year.

  • Experiment: Organize Bootcamp/Barcamp style conference (community proposes talks and votes on them to be done at the beginning) with a broader Web topic. If successful this can be done more frequently and maybe even be adapted to fit into an evening, or be expanded to two days. Our hypothesis is that this brings in more interested people than the talks we regularly organize without clear call-to-action.
    • Owner: Marc and Michael
  • We continue to ask Mozilla to make its decision process more transparent, so community members can feel more involved.
    • This was a major concern during our community meetup. This goal is not fully defined and we will work together to phrase our scope accordingly. Also this goal definition is a “working draft”, therefore not perfectly phrased.
    • Owner: Gion-Andri
  • All currently used communication channels are clearly listed on mozilla.ch (above the fold, in the fancy squares)
  • Our new Twitter tool is in place and functional and the primary Twitter client which enables all of our community to send tweets.
  • Experiment: Create Telegram channel
    • Hypothesis: Discussion happens between more than 2 persons
Non-primary goals, we will keep in mind but are not phrased as official goals:
  • Continue technical talks
  • Frequent meetups (informal as well!)
  • Twitter to be continued as information source
  • Discourse as documentation of decisions and possible interaction by other Mozillians if they don’t agree
  • Support Rust community

In the next few days we will open corresponding issues in the mozilla.ch participation repository to track this work.

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Mozilla Switzerland – Community Meetup June 2016

Posted by in Mozilla, MozillaCH, MozillaParticipation, mozillareps

On June 20th the Swiss Mozillians met in Zurich to discuss the second half of the year. The goal was to come up with objectives for mozilla.ch that are aligned with the current Mozilla strategy and the Participation Team and Mozilla Reps goals.

At first we did a retrospective, here are the key results:

What should we stop doing?

  • Discussions on the mailing list
  • posting “meta” discussions on Github
  • focusing on initiatives we don’t have time for
  • excluding people from discussions (see “meta discussions”)
  • focusing on Zurich
  • creating single point of failures
  • missing to provide clear pathways to contribute when we have a talk

What should we start doing?

  • Create a central hub for all resources MozillaCH-related (in terms of “Get involved”)
  • Focus on a few single strengths we have instead of a lot of single initiatives we can only go so far for
  • Start non-linear discussions on discourse
  • Have more event locations to get to people that can’t come to Zurich or Lausanne
  • Be more clear about the strengths of single community members and support them with initiatives that fit into the general direction of Mozilla
  • Start using communication channels specific to the audience we want to reach

What should we continue doing?

  • Event organization works well
  • Github issues for tracking
  • Team work at meetups
  • Keeping things simple (not having a lot of bureaucracy hassle)

With that in mind, we came up with two objectives. Both are aligned with overall Mozilla strategy pieces. The first one is Core Strength, the second one is Prototyping the Future. None of these Key Results are easy to achieve, but we think that with these we can achieve a good base for the upcoming years.

Objective 1: Grow our core contributor strengths and be amazing at being visible in Switzerland

  • Key Result 1: We have at least 5 core contributors that are active on Discourse
  • Key Result 2: 30% of threads on Discourse are created by non Community Focus Group members
  • Key Result 3: At least 25 GitHub issues are created from a discussion on Discourse with clear steps on how to implement
  • Key Result 4: Have started an at least monthly meetup group around Developer Tools to have “hacking evenings”
  • Key Result 5: At least 3 persons are involved in organizing events
  • Key Result 6: At least 4 persons are involved in creating content for Twitter tweets and answering mentions
  • Key Result 7: The mozilla.ch website clearly reflects on where we want people to get involved in MozillaCH covering all functional areas provided on the Wiki page
  • Key Result 8: At least 80% of functional areas are covered by at least 2 contact persons

Objective 2: We are a driver in prototyping Firefox for the future

  • Key Result 1: We have started a monthly meetup group around Developer Tools to have hacking evenings, providing guidance to new people to get involved in hacking DevTools
  • Key Result 2: We have at least 2 hackathons for 2 different components
  • Key Result 3: We have at least 20 confirmed Nightly users who know how to submit bugs
  • Key Result 4: We are engaging at least 10 people in QA’ing Servo for specific websites
  • Key Result 5: We engage at least 2 persons to work on positron, spidernode or browser.html

What do you find intriguing? What would you like to know more about? Jump into a discussion on Discourse or participate in our GitHub Participation issue repository.

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Alpha Review – Using Janitor to contribute to Firefox

Posted by in Mozilla, MozillaCH, MozillaParticipation, mozillareps

At the Firefox Hackathon in Zurich we used The Janitor to contribute to Firefox. It’s important to note that it’s still in alpha and invite-only.

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 14.37.23

The Janitor was started by Jan Keromnes, a Mozilla employee. While still in an alpha state, Jan gave us access to it so we could test run it at our hackathon. Many thanks to him for spending his Saturday on IRC and helping us out with everything!

Once you’re signed up, you can click on “Open in Cloud9” and directly get to the Cloud9 editor who kindly sponsor the premium accounts for this project. Cloud9 is a pure-web IDE based on real Linux environments, with an insanely fast editor.

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 14.38.23

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 14.38.50

At the hackathon we ran into a Cloud9 “create workspace” limitation, but according to Jan this should be fixed now.

Setting up

After an initial “git pull origin master” in the Cloud9 editor terminal, you can start to build Firefox in there. Simply running “./mach build” is enough. For me this took about 12 minutes for the first time, while my laptop still needs more than 50 minutes to compile Firefox. This is definitely an improvement. Further you won’t need anything else than a browser!

I had my environment ready in about 15 minutes if you count the time to compile Firefox. Comparing this to my previous setups, this solves a lot of dependency-hell problems and is also way faster.

Running the newly compiled Firefox

The Janitor includes a VNC viewer which opens a new tab and you can run your compiled Firefox in there. You can start a shell and run “./mach run” in the Firefox directory and you can start testing your changes.

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 14.49.08

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 14.50.20

Running ESLint

For some of the bugs we tackled at the hackathon, we needed to run ESLint (well, would be good to run this anyway, no matter what part of the code base you’re changing). The command looks like this:

user@e49de5f6914e:~/firefox$ ./mach eslint --no-ignore devtools/client/webconsole/test/browser_webconsole_live_filtering_of_message_types.js
0:00.40 Running /usr/local/bin/eslint
0:00.40 /usr/local/bin/eslint --plugin html --ext [.js,.jsm,.jsx,.xml,.html] --no-ignore devtools/client/webconsole/test/browser_webconsole_live_filtering_of_message_types.js

/home/user/firefox/devtools/client/webconsole/test/browser_webconsole_live_filtering_of_message_types.js
8:1   warning  Could not load globals from file browser/base/content/browser-eme.js: Error: ENOENT: no such file or directory, open '/home/user/firefox/browser/base/content/browser-eme.js'  mozilla/import-browserjs-globals
8:1   warning  Definition for rule 'mozilla/import-globals' was not found                                                                                                                     mozilla/import-globals
8:1   error    Definition for rule 'keyword-spacing' was not found                                                                                                                            keyword-spacing
18:17  error    content is a possible Cross Process Object Wrapper (CPOW)                                                                                                                      mozilla/no-cpows-in-tests

✖ 4 problems (2 errors, 2 warnings)

0:02.85 Finished eslint. Errors encountered.

As you might see from the input, running this in the Janitor environment results in not finding the Mozilla-specific rules. The reason here is that the eslint npm package is installed globally. Globally installed eslint can’t find the locally installed mozilla-eslint-plugin. In my opinion the easiest fix would be to not install it globally, just within the firefox directory (running “./mach eslint –setup”) while spinning up the instance should be enough here.

We could circumvent this problem by changing the global npm prefix and then running it with “/new/path/eslint …” so it doesn’t call the other one. In hindsight, we could just have installed it to the directory and then call it through node_modules.

Update, May 5, 15:09: Jan has has fixed this plugin issue :)

Creating a patch

Creating a patch is really easy, following the tutorial on MDN is enough. We were very happy to see that the moz-git-tools are already installed by default, so you can just create your own branch, checkin your changes and run “git format-patch -p -k master” to get a Git patch file. Since we need a Mercurial patch, you then run “git-patch-to-hg-patch” and you can upload the resulting file to Bugzilla and you’re set!

Those two commands could maybe be aliased by default so running “create-patch” or similar would directly do this for you to further decrease the work you need to do manually.

Seeing it in action

Conclusion

After some initial account problems, we didn’t really find any other bugs apart from the ESLint situation. Again, thanks a lot to Jan for providing us the environment and letting us test it. This will change the live of a lot of contributors! For now The Janitor supports contributions to Firefox, Chrome, Thunderbird, Servo and KDE. There is also a GitHub repository for it.

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Firefox Hackathon Zurich April 2016

Posted by in Mozilla, MozillaCH, MozillaParticipation, mozillareps

Last Saturday we’ve held a Firefox Hackathon in Zurich, Switzerland. We’ve had 12 people joining us.

Introduction

At first I gave an introduction to Firefox and introduced the agenda of the hackathon.

Dev Tools Talk

After my talk we heard an amazing talk from Daniele who came from Italy to attend this hackathon. He talked about the Dev Tools and gave a nice introduction to new features!

Hackathon

Before the hackathon we created a list of “good first bugs” that we could work on. This was a great thing to do, since we could give the list to the attendees and they could pick a bug to work on. Setting up the environment to hack was pretty easy. We’ve used “The Janitor” to hack on Firefox, I’ll write a second blog post introducing you to this amazing tool! We ran into a few problems with it, but at the end we all could hack on Firefox!

We worked on about 13 different bugs, and we finished 10 patches! This is a great achievement, we probably couldn’t have done that if we needed more time to set up a traditional Firefox environment. Here’s the full list:

Thanks to everybody who contributed, great work! Also a big thanks to Julian Descolette, a Dev Tools employee from Switzerland who supported us as a really good mentor. Without him we probably couldn’t have fixed some of the bugs in that time!

Feedback

At the end of the hackathon we did a round of feedback. In general the feedback was rated pretty well, though we might have some things to improve for the next time.

40% of the attendees had their first interaction with our community at this hackathon! And guess what, 100% of the attendees who filled out the survey would be joining another hackathon in 6 months:

For the next hackathon, we might want to have a talk about the Firefox Architecture in general to give some context to the different modules. Also for the next hackathon we probably will have a fully working Janitor (meaning not alpha status anymore) which will help even more as well.

Lessions learned

  • Janitor will be great for hackathons (though still Alpha, so keep an eye on it)
  • The mix of talk + then directly start hacking works out
  • The participants are happy if they can create a patch in a few minutes to learn the process (Creating Patch, Bugzilla, Review, etc) and I think they are more motivated for future patches

All in all I think this was a great success. Janitor will make every contributor’s life way easier, keep it going! You can find the full album on Flickr (thanks to Daniele for the great pictures!).

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Mozilla Switzerland IoT Hackathon in Lausanne

Posted by in Mozilla, MozillaCH, MozillaParticipation, mozillareps

On April 2nd 2016 we held a small IoT Hackathon in Lausanne to brainstorm about the Web and IoT. This was aligned with the new direction that Mozilla is taking on.

Preparation
We started to organize the Hackathon on Github, so everyone can participate. Geoffroy was really helpful to organize the space for it at Liip.ch. Thanks a lot to them, without them organizing our events would be way harder!

The Hackathon
We expected more people to come, but as mentioned above, this is our first self-organized event in the French speaking part of Switzerland. Nevertheless we were four persons with an interest in hacking something together.

Geoffroy and Paul started to have a look at Vaani.iot, one of the projects that Mozilla is currently pushing on. They started to build it on their laptops, unfortunately the Vaani documentation is not good enough yet to see the full picture and what you could do with it. We’re planning to send some feedback regarding that to the Vaani team.

In the meantime Martin and I set up my Raspberry Pi and started to write a small script together that reads out the temperature from one of the sensors. Once we’ve done that, I created a small API to have the temperature returned in JSON format.

At this point, we decided we wanted to connect those two pieces and create a Web app to read out the temperature and announce it through voice. Since we couldn’t get Vaani working, we decided to use the WebSpeech API for this. The voice output part is available in Firefox and Chrome right now, therefore we could achieve this goal without using any non-standard APIs. After that Geoffroy played around with the voice input feature of this API. This is currently only working in Chrome, but there is a bug to implement it in Firefox as well. In the spirit of the open web, we decided to ignore the fact that we need to use Chrome for now, and create a feature that is built on Web standards that are on track to standardization.

After all, we could achieve something together and definitely had some good learnings during that.

Lessions learned

  • Organizing a hackathon for the first time in a new city is not easy
  • We probably need to establish an “evening-only” meetup series first, so we can attract participants that identify with us
  • We could use this opportunity to document the Liip space in Lausanne for future events on our Events page on the wiki
  • Not all projects are well documented, we need to work on this!

After the Hackathon

Since I needed to do a project for my studies that involves hardware as well, I could take the opportunity and take the sensors for my project.

You can find the Source Code on the MozillaCH github organization. It currently regularly reads out the two temperature sensors and checks if there is any movement registered by the movement sensor. If the temperature difference is too high it sends an alarm to the NodeJS backend. The same goes for the situation where it detects movement. I see this as a first step into my own take on a smart home, it would need a lot of work and more sensors to be completely useful though.

 

 

 

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Mozilla Switzerland Goals H1 2016

Posted by in Mozilla, MozillaCH, mozillareps

Back in November we had a Community Meetup. The goal was to get a current status on the Community and define plans and goals for 2016. To do that, we started with a SWOT-Analysis. You can find it here.

With these remarks in mind, we started to define goals for 2016. Since there are a lot of changes within one year, the goals will currently only focus on the first part of the year. Then we can evaluate them, shift metrics if needed, and define new goals. This allows us to be more flexible.

The goals are highly influenced by the OKR (Objective – Key Results) Framework. To document open issues that support this goal, I have created a repository in our MozillaCH GitHub organization. The goal is to assign the “overall goal” label to each issue. You can find a good documentation on GitHub issues in their documentation. There is a template you can use for new issues.

  • Objective 1: The community is vibrant and active due to structured contribution areas
  • Objective 2: MozillaCH is a valuable partner for privacy in Switzerland
  • Objective 3: There is a vibrant community in the “Romandie” which is part of the overall community
  • Objective 4: The MozillaCH website is the place to link to for community topics
  • Objective 5: With talks and events we increase our reach and provide a valuable information source regarding the Open Web
  • Objective 6: Social Media is a crucial part of our activities providing valuable information about Mozilla and the Open Web

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We know that not all of those goals are easily achievable, but this gives us a good way to be ambitious. To a successful first half of 2016, let’s bring our community further and keep rocking the Open Web!

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